Ponder on the Greek Genocide, Americans


islam-no-thanks

John R. Houk

© February 2, 2017

 

As WWI was nearing its end for Ottoman Turkey, their defeat now guaranteed and the loss of what was left of a large empire was unfolding before Ottoman-Turkish eyes. The Turkish power elites began to focus on Turkish nationalism. Turkish nationalism had no place for non-Turkish and non-Muslim minorities residing on Turkish land.

 

Eventually a Turkish power elite struggle ended with a leader Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (Greek perspective and Armenian perspective) winning the day. Kemal viewed the WWI loss was partly due to a lack modernization that European nations had experienced. Kemal changed his name to solely Ataturk and began a secularizing process but still a nationalist process.

 

Between the Turkish elite struggles through to Ataturk hegemony, Turkey’s minorities began to experience an ethnic cleansing genocide. Christians in Turkey experienced genocide. The Armenian and Assyrian Christians suffered the most. The Greek people of western Turkey had a heritage of the area that stretched to a time before the birth of Christ.

 

At the end of WWI and the Greco-Turkish war an exchange of Turkish Greeks for Greek Muslims are agreed upon. The sadness is that the Greeks of Turkey were brutalized in their expulsion with loss of property, assaults, rapes and in many cases death. Also a sad issue: most of the Greeks leaving Turkey occurred between 2014 and 1922 as the losing Greek army retreated from Turkey. The fleeing Greeks in this stage were the most brutalized by the Turks and numbered probably close to a million or so. After the Lausanne Treaty legalized a population exchange between Greece and Turkey, the number of Greeks leaving was much smaller:

 

According to official records of the Mixed Commission, the ‘Greeks’ who were transferred after 1923 numbered 189,916 and the number of Muslims expelled to Turkey was 355,635 (Ladas 1932:438–9; using the same source, however, Eddy 1931:201 states that the exchange involved ‘192,356 Greeks from Turkey and 354,647 Muslims from Greece’). While accurate figures are impossible to ascertain, it is probable that the total number of Christians who entered Greece at this time was in the region of 1.2 million, the main wave being in 1922 during the period of hostilities (Bierstadt 1925: 248–250; Eddy 1931: 251; Ladas 1932: 438–442; Pentzopoulos 1962: 96–99; Kitromilides and Alexandris 1984–5; Hirschon 1998 [1989]: 36–9). (2 The Consequences of the Lausanne Convention, AN OVERVIEW; Demographic effects [pg. 2]; By Renée Hirschon; Oxford University – School of Anthropology; 2003)

 

turks-slaughter-christian-greeksThe Greek perspective of the genocide can be read at “THE GREEK GENOCIDE: 1914-1923” among other places you can research. The first paragraph sums up the horrors experienced by Greeks living in Turkey in the time period:

 

The Greek Genocide was the systematic extermination of the Greek subjects of the Ottoman Empire before, during and after World War I (1914-1923). It was instigated by successive governments of the Ottoman Empire; the Committee of Union and Progress Party (C.U.P), and the Turkish Nationalist Movement of Mustafa Kemala Atatürk.  It included massacres, forced deportations and death marches, summary expulsions, boycotts, rape, forced conversion to Islam, conscription into labor battalions, arbitrary executions, and destruction of Christian Orthodox cultural, historical and religious monuments. According to various sources, approximately 1 million Ottoman Greeks perished during this period.

 

Other sources have differing stats to one degree or another. The point being is that Turkish Muslims were not pleasant toward Greeks then. Today the unpleasantness continues with illegal refugees flooding into Greece permitted largely by European Union (EU) multiculturalism. You’d think history would have taught the Greek government some lessons, right? Some observations by the essayist Fjordman (Thanks to Anders Breivik now exposed as Peder Jansen), should not only wake up the Greeks but also Americans. American Democrats are trying to force Muslim refugees down American throats in the name of Multiculturalism as if that is our “American values”. IT IS NOT! Our American values toward immigration is to welcome but to assimilate as in out of many, one American nation emerges (E PLURIBUS UNUM). NOT many diverse cultures tearing America apart!

 

Think of that as you read the Fjordman essay below from the Gates of Vienna.

 

JRH 2/2/17

Please Support NCCR

*************

Trojan Seahorses in Greece

 

By Fjordman

Posted January 16, 2017 11:53 pm

Posted by Baron Bodissey

Gates of Vienna

 

I visited Greece in the spring of 2013. Once a leader of ancient European civilization, Greece is now at the epicenter of many of the ills befalling modern European civilization. These include the financial crisis in the Eurozone and non-European mass immigration.

 

In Athens, the Thiseio metro station is situated close to the Temple of Hephaestus at the ancient Agora. When I visited it on several occasions, I saw immigrants urinating near the temple in broad daylight. The migrants who gathered in this area seemed to come from places such as Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan. I doubt all of them had entered legally.

 

Twenty-five centuries ago, Socrates lectured here. Today, Adbul Karim the illegal immigrant urinates here. This was in 2013. Things were about to get a lot worse.

 

Aristotle once founded biology as a scientific discipline while studying marine life on the beaches of Lesbos. More recently, Lesbos, Kos and other islands in the Aegean Sea have witnessed a flood wave of predominately Muslim immigrants entering uninvited.

 

The number of illegal immigrants coming to Europe was already significant in 2013. It continued growing in 2014 and exploded the following year. In 2015, more than a million people from the Islamic world and Africa forced their way into Europe, causing chaos from the Balkans to Germany. Most of the migrants were young and physically fit men of military age. Some of the hostile Muslims shouted “Allahu akbar!” while attacking the local police. Yet these aggressive intruders are still routinely labeled “refugees” by the Western mass media.

 

In the autumn of 2015, a single Greek island could receive thousands of boat migrants in a single day. I watched several drone videos during the peak of this influx. It looked like an invasion on a nearly industrial scale. It resembled D-Day on the beaches of Normandy in 1944, only without the tanks.

 

An invasion does not always require tanks or fighter jets.

Lesbos alone had to deal with tens of thousands of life jackets abandoned by the migrants.[1]

 

It would be tempting to call these culturally alien intruders Trojan seahorses, since many of them arrive in small boats or rubber dinghies. But perhaps that is unfair. Seahorses are gentle animals, after all. It is a documented fact that some of these Muslim asylum seekers were involved in serious crime and deadly terrorist attacks in Europe afterwards.

 

kos-greece

Kos Greece

 

In December 2016 and January 2017, I spent some days on the islands of Kos and Rhodes. The town of Kos has a small but worthwhile archaeological museum, situated next to a mosque dating back to Ottoman times. Compared to world-class institutions in Athens such as the Acropolis Museum or the National Archaeological Museum, it was modest. Yet it contains a fine collection of statues and other ancient artifacts. It is testimony to the incredible richness of Greek art history that even local museums contain objects of such high quality.

 

kos-greece-2

Kos Greece 2

 

An Askleipion was a healing temple dedicated to Asklepios, the ancient Greek god of medicine. In addition to the ones in Thessaly and Epidaurus in mainland Greece, the Askleipion on Kos was among the greatest such establishments in the Greco-Roman world. Hippocrates of Kos, perhaps the most important Greek physician in Antiquity, probably received his medical training here. Galen, another prominent Greek physician, studied at the Askleipion at Pergamon on the west coast of Asia Minor.

 

The Staff of Asklepios, a serpent-entwined rod, is still used internationally as a symbol of medicine, healing and pharmacies. When visiting Kos around New Year’s, there were very few tourists on the island. I literally had the entire Askleipion all to myself. You can see from the ruins that it must have been a big and prominent temple a couple of thousand years ago.

 

asklepion-of-kos

Fjordman, Kos #1: Asklepion of Kos, where Hippocrates once studied and worked

 

There is a statue of Hippocrates next to the modern harbor in Kos town. It is inscribed with the Hippocratic Oath for the ethical practice of medicine. “Do no harm,” the basic message of the Hippocratic Oath, remains a guiding principle for many modern physicians.

 

statue-of-hippocrates-at-kos

Fjordman, Kos #6: Statue of Hippocrates in the harbor of Kos town

 

For several days in a row I could see a small group of illegal immigrants sitting directly behind this statue. They were literally hiding in the shadow of Hippocrates. There was some symbolism to this. Muslims force their way into Europe, using European ethical ideals and humanism as a weapon to gain entry. The migrants I saw in January 2017 did not speak Arabic. Based on their looks, I would guess that some of them came from South Asia, perhaps from Pakistan or Bangladesh, while others may have come from Afghanistan or Central Asia.

muslim-migrants-at-kos

Muslim Migrants at Kos

 

Kos is located very close to the west coast of Anatolia or Asia Minor, the country we now call Turkey. Using only the naked eye, I could clearly see individual houses in Turkey. You hardly need a motorized boat to travel this short distance. A kayak would be enough. In calm weather, an able swimmer might be able to swim from Turkey to Greece and the EU.

 

Several other Greek islands such as Samos, Lesbos and Chios are also situated close to the Turkish coastline. All of these islands have experienced major problems with illegal immigrants. Some of these problems still remain in 2017.

 

Turkey has been rocked by a series of deadly terror attacks in recent years. The number of foreign tourists visiting the country has fallen sharply because of this between 2014 and 2017.

 

The Islamic State (ISIS) is suspected to be behind several attacks on Turkish soil. This is somewhat ironic. Accusations have earlier been made that Turkish authorities quietly aided ISIS, as long as they were fighting the Kurds.[2] 2017 was just a couple of hours old when Turkey was hit by yet another bloody attack. This time, the target was a nightclub in Istanbul.[3]

 

For all its substantial social and economic problems, Greece is still a safer travel destination than neighboring Turkey. You will see more veiled Muslim women in Brussels, Berlin, Stockholm or Amsterdam, not to mention London or Paris, than you see in Rhodes or Kos.

 

Most of the migrants who arrive in Greek islands do not want to stay there. They want to get to countries in northwestern Europe with more generous welfare states.

 

muslim-migrants-at-kos-2

Muslim Migrants at Kos 2

 

The number of migrants entering Greece from Turkey was sharply reduced in 2016 compared to 2015. However, some illegal immigrants continue to arrive in Greek islands. Boat migrants crossing the Mediterranean along the longer route, from North Africa to Italy, reached record levels in 2016.[4] Moreover, this temporary reduction in the flow of migrants into southeast Europe is entirely dependent upon the actions and policies of Turkish authorities.

 

The Turkish government and President Erdogan engage in open blackmail and demographic warfare against Europe. They have repeatedly stated that they want money and visa-free access to the EU for millions of Muslims in Turkey.[5] Otherwise, they will unleash the hordes from the Middle East again.

 

That is not the worst-case scenario. The worst-case scenario is that Turkey, an increasingly Islamic and unstable country, itself might descend into a full-blown civil war. Such an event would trigger even larger population movements towards Europe than we have seen so far.

 

Greeks have been at the receiving end of one of the longest campaigns of ethnic cleansing in human history. For nearly 1,400 years, Muslims have been wiping out communities of Greek-speaking Christians in the eastern Mediterranean. Greeks fought a long and bloody struggle to liberate themselves from centuries of brutal and oppressive Turkish rule.

 

Now, Multiculturalism, the EU and mass immigration bring Islam back. Greeks and other Europeans are expected to celebrate this. In 2017 Athens will get its first new mosque since Ottoman times.[6] This happens partly after pressure from the pro-Islamic policies of the EU.

 

By early 2017, the migrant situation in Greece was calmer than in 2015. Yet I sensed an underlying fear among some of the local Greeks that the troubles could restart again at any moment. The Islamic world and Africa have booming populations and dysfunctional societies.

 

Hundreds of millions of people in these overpopulated regions would potentially like to move to Europe. The apocalyptic scenes of 2015 may simply be a prelude to what is yet to come.

 

Notes:

 

  1. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-34675552 Migrant crisis: The lifejacket ‘mountains’ of Lesbos. 30 October 2015. http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/640102/migrant-crisis-life-jackets-greece PICTURED: Images of dumped life jackets show devastation of the migrant crisis. Feb 1, 2016.

 

  1. http://www.businessinsider.com/links-between-turkey-and-isis-are-now-undeniable-2015-7 Senior Western official: Links between Turkey and ISIS are now ‘undeniable’ Jul. 28, 2015.

 

  1. http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/01/01/new-year-attack-on-packed-istanbul-club-leaves-3-dead.html New Year’s attack on packed Istanbul club leaves 39 dead. January 01, 2017.

 

  1. http://www.thelocal.it/20170106/italys-boat-migrant-numbers-surged-20-in-2016 Italy boat migrant numbers surge 20% in 2016. 6 January 2017.

 

  1. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38103375 Migrant crisis: Turkey threatens EU with new surge. 25 November 2016.

 

  1. http://www.ekathimerini.com/215222/article/ekathimerini/news/greek-capitals-first-modern-mosque-expected-by-end-april Greek capital’s first modern mosque expected by end-April. January 12, 2017.

 

_______________

Ponder on the Greek Genocide, Americans

John R. Houk

© February 2, 2017

_____________

DONATE TO FJORDMAN [To Donate, go to the bottom of the Gates of Vienna essay, and click on the Fjordman logo that says “Donate to Fjordman”. This will take you to the Fjordman PayPal donation page.]:

fjordman-donate-foto  

For a complete archive of Fjordman’s writings, see the multi-index listing in the Fjordman Files.

 

Gates of Vienna Homepage