REGIONAL HEGEMONY


Eligah Barrett (not sure if a pseudonym or actual) uses sources to put together a profile of Iran’s agenda. As the title suggests, Iran is seeking to be a military power at least regionally. I suspect an even greater agenda with Iran’s pursuit of nukes.

 

This yet another reason to NOT TRUST Iran about any nuclear deal WHATSOEVER! Especially as negotiated by former President Barack Hussein Obama, the most corrupt President in American history.

 

JRH 10/30/17

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REGIONAL HEGEMONY

 

By Eligah Barrett

Oct 28, 2017

Posted on G+ Crush Jihad

 

Back in 1992, the New York Times wrote, “Becoming second to Saudi Arabia as a world oil power, IRAN EXPECTS TO FURTHER ITS GREATER AMBITION OF BEING THE MOST IMPORTANT REGIONAL POWER IN THE PERSIAN GULF, A LONG-HELD FOREIGN-POLICY OBJECTIVE” (NOV. 7, 1992).

The article examined how Iran planned to achieve this objective: More troubling to other countries in the area and to the west is the other side of Iran’s plan to achieve this objective: A HUGE REARMAMENT PROGRAM, financed largely by the New oil money.

“The Islamic Affairs Analyst of Gloucester, England, printed an article in August 1994 that said, ‘Iran is pursuing a parallel policy of surrounding Israel with implacable enemies. Turkey is moving closer to Iran. To Israel’s North, IRAN has deluged Hezbollah in Lebanon with money and weapons. With Hamas in control of Gaza, Tehran could ignite another conflict on Israel’s western and northern borders at any moment. Iran is also’ opening another front in the West Bank, which crawls with zealots sympathetic to if not in the pay of Iran. And Egypt, since the ouster of President Mubarak, is moving rapidly toward discarding its peace treaty with Israel as it moves into Iran’s camp.’” [Found at the Trumpet]

Of course, the Shiites controls Iran and are a majority 60 percent in Iraq. The U.S.’s removal of Saddam Hussein in 2003 opened the way for Iran to heavily infiltrate Iraq, providing armaments, financing and training to Shiites militias, sending thousands of operatives into the country and establishing economic ties with it. Moreover, the most powerful political party in Iraq is allied with Tehran. This could be a decisive factor causing Iraq to fall under Iran’s control.

“That 1994 Islamic Affairs Analyst article said further, starting at the foot of the Red Sea, ‘IRAN is set to increase its influence considerably in both Somalia and Yemen. … Further up the Red Sea coast, Sudan is already firmly in pro-Iranian hands with [Omar Hassan] al-Bashir’s military regime no more than a front for Hassan al-Bashir’s Islamists. And it is from bases in Sudan that Islamist fundamentalists are beginning to undermine the stability of the newly independent Eritrea, which, it should be noted, now controls all of what was formerly Ethiopia’s Red Sea coastline.’” [ibid.]

These trends continue today. Iran has continued to send arms shipments to Islamists in Somalia. In March 2008, Iran signed a military agreement with Sudan. In May 2008, it further boosted its ties with Eritrea, signing trade and investment agreements. Again, the following year, in April 2009, IRAN and Eritrea, together with Algeria, agreed to expand their bilateral cooperation. Iran has a frightening influence and control in North Africa, which greatly intensified with the unrest that began erupting in Arab states in early 2011. The Tunisian government fell in January into the hands of the radical Muslims. The Ennahda party, the Islamist party banned under the dictatorship of Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, quickly emerged as probably the most powerful political force in the country. In October 2011, the Islamists party won the nation’s first free elections since independence in 1956. That is almost exactly what happened in Egypt when its first-ever free elections ushered in the Muslim Brotherhood in 2012. However, it didn’t take long before discontent surged against the hard-liner Ennahda. Assassinations of two prominent opposition figures in 2013 threatened another revolution in Tunisia. It was only averted when rival factions negotiated a peaceful abdication of the elected Islamist government. Tunisia then elected the secular-nationalist Nidaa Tounes Party. Its candidate, Beji Caid Essebsi, became president. Essebsi, however, is a former official of the ousted Ben Ali regime. He has come under fire for Tunisia’s failing economy and for terrorist attacks that have crippled Tunisia’s tourism industry. Again, it is a scenario not much different from Egypt’s.

Iran has also heavily infiltrated Yemen and Bahrain, and it is deeply entrenched in Afghanistan. Many moderate Arab nations fear, and are afraid to offend, IRAN.

Here is what the Islamic Affairs Analyst of May 13, 1992, said: “The main strategic aim of Iran is to dominate the Persian Gulf and environs. An important step in achieving this goal is to GAIN UNDISPUTED LEADERSHIP OF THE RADICAL ISLAMIC CAMP.” Many of the good intelligence reports about Iran have proven true. Do we see just how powerful Iran is becoming militarily? Prof. Barry Rubin wrote in 2007, “IRAN tries to extend its influence in THREE ways: propaganda and incitement; the promotion of client groups, and projecting the state’s own power. Today, IRAN sponsors radical Islamist groups in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, and among in Palestinians as well as in other countries. Its two most important clients are Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Palestinian Hamas group (Global Politician, July 25, 2007).” [the Trumpet]

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Edited by John R. Houk

All source links and any text embraced by brackets are by the Editor.

 

© Eligah Barrett

 

Saudi Gulf Nations Preparing to Send Militaries to Bahrain


John R. Houk

© March 14, 2011

 

Bahrain is a near microscopic dot on the map that otherwise might be thought of as Saudi territory. Bahrain is a micro-Sheikdom with oil wealth and the port of the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet.

 

Persian Gulf- Saudi Peninsula, Bahrain, Iran etc 

PERSIAN GULF NATION MAP

 

Little tiny Bahrain has been besieged by Shi’ites in their tiny island nation who have revolted over the absolute monarchy (officially constitutional but you know…) that controls the government and which is a Sunni royal family. The unrest in Bahrain is not new but the recent intensity is undoubtedly a manifestation of Muslim unrest that began in Tunisia and spread across the Maghreb and the Muslim Middle East to change the old regimes to a more Ummah (Islamic Community) oriented government for the people.

 

The difference in the unrest in Bahrain than in other grassroots Islamic revolts is that it has more to do with the majority Shi’ite have-nots unhappy with their existence as opposed to the privileged Sunni minority haves that are well off. Since this is a Shia vs. Sunni thing in Bahrain, who do you think might possibly use the unrest as a platform to flex muscles against its Sunni competitor? Yep, that would be Iran. This is especially the case since Arab Peninsula nations are preparing to send military assistance to tiny Bahrain in the form of troops with the big dog being Saudi Arabia.

 

JRH 3/14/11