UANI Chairman Senator Joseph Lieberman WaPo Op-ed on Iran Deal


Joe Lieberman is a former Senator from Connecticut and was the 2000 Democrat Party nominee for Vice President. In his last Senatorial election the Dem Party dumped him for a younger guy. Lieberman did not appreciate the lack of support so ran as an Independent and won re-election. On August 14 Joe Lieberman wrote a very logical yet scathing denunciation of Obama and Kerry’s Iran Nuke Deal. It is worth the read.

JRH 8/17/15

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In Case You Missed It: UANI Chairman Senator Joseph Lieberman Op-ed in Washington Post

United Against Nuclear Iran

Sent: 8/17/2015 3:12 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 17, 2015
Phone: (212) 922-0063
press@uani.com

United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) Chairman Joseph I. Lieberman, former U.S. Senator from Connecticut, called on Congress to reject the Iran agreement in an op-ed published Friday, August 14 in The Washington Post.

Congress Should Step Up to Block This Terrible Iran Agreement

By Joseph I. Lieberman
The Washington Post
August 14, 2015

As debate intensifies over the nuclear agreement reached with Iran, the Obama administration has sought to deflect criticism by arguing that there is no alternative to the current framework, no matter what its flaws, and that its rejection by Congress is guaranteed to produce catastrophe – isolating the United States from its allies and destroying any prospect for a diplomatic settlement. A vote against its preferred policy, the administration has argued (not for the first time), is a vote for war.

The administration has used these same arguments before to try to stop Congress from imposing economic sanctions on Iran. Not only did the predictions of catastrophe fail to deter Congress from moving ahead but also, when the sanctions were adopted, the doomsday forecasts were proven wrong – just as the current predictions will be. And when the scare tactics failed and the vote count in Congress started to turn heavily against its position, the White House changed course – just as it can and should now.

I was a member of the Senate when, between 2009 and 2012, Congress developed a series of bills that dramatically increased pressure on Tehran for its illicit nuclear activities, including adopting a measure in late 2011 that effectively banned Iran from selling oil – its economic lifeblood – on international markets. In every case, senior Obama administration officials worked to block congressional efforts, warning that they were unnecessary, counterproductive and even dangerous.

Much like today, the White House repeatedly argued that sanctions would isolate the United States and alienate our allies whose help we needed. In the case of the oil ban, a Cabinet member bluntly told members that adopting the measure risked torpedoing the global economic recovery.

These predictions proved false. In fact, it was only because of the sanctions adopted by Congress, and ultimately signed by President Obama, that sufficient economic pressure was put on the Iranian government that its leaders came to the negotiating table – a truth the Obama administration now accepts and asserts. Our allies and partners did not always welcome new restrictions on doing business in Tehran, but in the end, they decided it was more important to do business in the United States.

It is important for members of Congress deciding how to vote on the current proposal to consider this history because it reminds us of the administration’s past misguided efforts to stop, slow or weaken sanctions bills. Equally important, recent legislative history tells us that as bipartisan congressional support for these bills began to snowball, the White House shifted its position.

At first, members of Congress – particularly Democrats – were warned not to do anything. But as the administration began to see the votes slipping from its grip, it changed tack and started negotiating the timing and scope of the prospective new law.

Indeed, the same drama played out just a few months ago, as Congress debated whether it should review the then-impending nuclear agreement.

Here too, the White House insisted that requiring legislative review and approval of a nuclear agreement with Iran was obstructive and damaging. But when Democrats began to support the legislation, and it was clear that a strong bipartisan coalition was converging around the idea, the administration withdrew its opposition and the president signed the legislation. The current congressional review is the result.

Congress should keep this experience in mind as it reviews the nuclear agreement with Iran. While the White House predictably is trying to scaremonger Capitol Hill into taking no action, experience and common sense suggest that the reality after congressional rejection is likely to be quite different. In the aftermath of Sen. Charles Schumer’s (D-N.Y.) principled and courageous stand against the proposed agreement, the prospects for such a bipartisan rejection seem increasingly likely.

If a bipartisan supermajority does in fact begin to cohere in criticism of the undeniable loopholes and inadequacies of the agreement, it is likely the administration will adjust its position. Provisions that today are impossible to change will become subject to renegotiation and clarification.

The best chance for a better deal, in other words, is overwhelming bipartisan pressure from Capitol Hill about the need for one, rather than acquiescing to the Obama administration’s claim that this is the best agreement possible because Iran will go no further.

That conclusion overlooks two truths: First, the Iranians are historically capable of adjusting positions they have claimed were immovable to new political realities, and, second, Iran, because of its depleted economy, needs an agreement much more than we do. Congress has the power now to act on these two realities.

This is an initiative, moreover, that many of our friends and partners are likely to welcome. Certainly the countries most affected by the deal – Israel and the Gulf Arab states – have made no secret of their dismay at the concessions granted to the Iranians in the quest for a settlement. Reportedly, even some of our European allies may not be wholly displeased by some congressional push-back – even if not all of them admit so publicly.

Not so long ago, everyone agreed that no deal with Iran was better than a bad deal. Now, the administration has changed the standard to whether it is possible to get a better deal than the flawed one it got in Vienna. History suggests it is – but we will never know unless a bipartisan super-majority comes together to demand it.

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United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) is a program of the American Coalition Against Nuclear Iran, Inc., a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

About UANI

United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) is a not-for-profit, non-partisan, advocacy group that seeks to prevent Iran from fulfilling its ambition to obtain nuclear weapons. UANI was founded in 2008 by Ambassador Mark D. Wallace, the late Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, former CIA Director Jim Woolsey and Middle East expert Dennis Ross. UANI’s private sanctions campaigns and state and Federal legislative initiatives focus on ending the economic and financial support of the Iranian regime by corporations at a time when the international community is attempting to compel Iran to abandon its illegal nuclear weapons program, support for terrorism and gross human rights violations.

The Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD), based in London, is an independent think tank that works closely with leaders in government, business, media and academia to develop multi-country responses to the major security and socio-economic challenges of our time and enhance Europe’s capacity to act effectively in the global arena. ISD’s activities seek to foster leadership and stability across Europe and its wider neighbourhood, actively bridging inter-communal, religious, socio-economic and political divides.

The UANI-ISD Initiative (UANI-ISD Initiative) is an unprecedented transatlantic partnership dedicated to combatting the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran. By partnering together, UANI and ISD combine the knowledge and experience of READ THE REST

Author: oneway2day

I am a Neoconservative Christian Right blogger. I also spend a significant amount of time of exposing theopolitical Islam.

One thought on “UANI Chairman Senator Joseph Lieberman WaPo Op-ed on Iran Deal”

  1. CamelShit!!!

    Congressional review: Treaties require ratification by a supermajority of the Senators present and voting. The bad deal is a treaty because it attempts to bind future administrations and congresses to its provisions. The Corker deal inverts the Constitution, requiring supermajorities in both houses to reject the bad deal.

    Shumer is not courageous. He waited until he was sure Obamination’s veto would not be overturned in the Senate and he is not actively campaigning against the bad deal. He is just covering his arse with voters opposed to the bad deal.

    There is no better deal. Muslims do not negotiate in good faith; after all, they are Muslims. Theirs is a false faith contrived to perpetuate war for the founder’s personal emolument. They will concede nothing.

    There is no passive solution to this problem. Kinetic action is required to remove the Mullocracy and destroy its nuclear bomb program.

    Liked by 1 person

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